Archives For Fulbright ETA

Qualified Teacher

May 15, 2013 — 1 Comment

I’m not TEFL, TOEFL, or CELTA certified. My only qualification as an English teacher are that I have a Bachelor’s degree (in finance) and I speak English.

As a Fulbrighter the State Department gave me two days of English teaching training before sending me off to a foreign land. After some time of teaching they flew me to Nepal for a four day conference on English Teaching, most of my fellow attendees were nearly finished with their teaching grants.

As far as the American Government is concerned, I’m here as a cultural ambassador. The Fulbright program funds people, not project. They look for people who will be good representatives of America abroad, all the better if they can teach.

Having some training in English teaching would have been helpful, but I’m afraid it also might have been stifling. I’m fortunate to teach at the Jesuit Academy of Trincomalee, since  they have encouraged me not to use a textbook and to go on my own. Not having been trained in English teaching has forced me to be more creative, and allowed me to focus on what I think will have the most impact.

I don’t teach to a test and I don’t teach out of a book. I am quite lucky.

When I was in China I was so frustrated that my Mandarin classes were based out of a textbook designed for students in America. I was living in Beijing and my teacher was instructing me on how to introduce my family and talk about clothing when I couldn’t order food at a restaurant. Priorities… After eight weeks in the classroom we got around to learning food words – needless to say I spent my tutoring hours working on more useful vocabulary and disregarded my formal studies.

I strive to to have my students value our time in the classroom together. At the end of every class I like to ask “what did we work on today?” This forces my students to reflect on the class and think about how it could be applicable to real life.

Teachers teaching to their students’ needs and desires, its a novel educational concept.

A man walks down the street, 
It’s a street in a strange world. 
Maybe it’s the Third World. 
Maybe it’s his first time around. 
He doesn’t speak the language, 
He holds no currency. 
He is a foreign man, 
He is surrounded by the sound, sound ….
     -Paul Simon, You Can Call Me Al

 

SriLankan Airlines flight 554 touched down in the predawn darkness of Colombo. Ten hours earlier we had embarked from Frankfurt, and had finally arrived a little after 4am local time. There was a light rain as we left the plane, and I was immediately struck by the humidity. Even in the early hours of the morning it was hot.

I met one other Fulbrighter in the airport and we found our driver, about an hour later we arrived at the bungalow where we will be staying for this month. After a large glass of water and a shower a nap was in order. Some hours later I woke up and made my way to the bank. Sidewalks, apparently, are not common in this section of Colombo. So the thirty minute walk was just what I needed to get out of the fog of jetlag.

After getting some currency, we made our way to a local restaurant. It was a simple place, with good food. For SLR 100 ($0.77) I had a delicious plate of food. It consisted of some rice topped with several curries – most of which were quite spicy – and a piece of chicken. Diving right into the culture, we ate without utensils; instead utilizing the tips of our fingers to mold the curry and rice into balls before shoveling them in our mouths.

Tomorrow starts our orientation.